Katja Krause

Katja Krause

Postdoctoral Fellow (2017-2018)
Katja Krause

Katja Krause is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard Divinity School for the academic year 2017-18. She received her Ph.D. in 2014 from King’s College London. Her dissertation, entitled “Aquinas’ Philosophy of the Beatific Vision: A Textual Analysis of his Commentary on the Sentences in Light of its Greek, Arabic, and Latin Sources,” investigated the precise ways in which Thomas Aquinas used his Greek, Arabic, and Latin sources to develop his own theory of the beatific vision, and considered this use against the historical context in which Latin theologians sought, each in his own way, to integrate the emerging Aristotelianism. After her doctorate, Krause was awarded a two-year Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, Germany, where she worked on a series of articles that examine the empirical turn of the 13th century that emerged from the appropriation of Averroes’ commentaries on the corpus Aristotelicum. Last year, she served as Assistant Professor in Medieval Thought at Durham University, UK.

 

This year at Harvard, she is working on her second book project entitled “Experience in Thirteenth-Century Natural Science and Medicine: Peter of Spain, Albert the Great, Arnald of Villanova.” This project investigates these three most influential, yet oftentimes neglected, proponents of the three disciplines of zoology, botany, and scholarly medicine in the 13th century. It has three main aims: (1) to show the precise historical and systematic factors that rendered experience constitutive of scientific knowledge in the 13th century; (2) to provide a detailed reconstruction of the nature of 13th-century scientific experience in all three of these disciplines; and (3) to chart the lasting effects that these 13th-century accounts of experience had on certain Renaissance and Early Modern accounts, such as those by Pietro Pomponazzi, Otto Brunfels, and Conrad Gessner.

 

In August 2018 Krause will return to Berlin where she will head a five-year Junior Research Group at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science on the theme of “Experience in the Pre-Modern Sciences of Soul and Body, ca. 800-1650.” This position at the MPI is a joint appointment and comes with a professorship at the Technische Universität Berlin.

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